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environment in africa is different than other parts of the world. i'm shiewfer that was a factor. some of the aircraft you're referring to are actually -- we don't want them in the inventory. of their sustain ability and capability. so, i mean, i know the analysis was done. i'm sure that it followed the rules of competition by the federal acquisition regulation. i don't know the ci think the am looking for here is before we do contracting as a default position on logistic, as we're, i mean, what i worry about in the sriing budget environment there's going to be more o tenden just sthat we should contract it out. because it's cheaper. and if afghanistan and iraq applaud anything that's not always true. and if you don't have adequate contracting oversight. it's not and especially when it's inherently a governmental function and we can spend a whole hearing tsh we -- we have many on that. i want to make sure it's a new day. as we begin to do new solicitation for new logistic support contract in any threat environment, there has to be a really detailed analysis done as to it is going to sa
despair and poverty as well as the uncertain implications of the environment of degradation. meanwhile the face of technological change and the spread of advanced military technology to state and nonstate actors poses an increasing challenge to the united states military. this is the strategic environment facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat declining budgets. the onset of these these resource constraints hazarded lead to significant and ongoing belt-tightening and military modernization force structure personnel and overhead expenditures. you have noted some of those mr. chairman. it has also given us an opportunity, an opportunity to to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities flexibility agility. the process began in the leadership of secretary gates who canceled or curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued undersecretary panetta who worked closely with the president and the joint c
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
-- [inaudible] the serious threat assessment our threat environment is changing. threats are more interconnected and viral. defense which it first -- disruption with the u.s national interest. i would ketrn to a few of the issues e identify in the statement for the record. our statement to the lead was cyber. as mor more state and demonstrate actors gained expertise. it's important to reach a global threat cannot be overstated. this year our discussion natural resources also more prominent because climb in disease and competition for natural resources and huge national security implications. many import are extreme war and food stress that can destablize governments that can trigger conflict. on the issue of terrorism, the threat from al qaeda and the potential for a massive coordinated attack on the united may be diminished. but it's more diffuse. as the president stated on tuesday about the boston marathon bombing we don't know it was planned by an group effort or individual act. lone inspire our affiliated group are determined to attack. the turmoil in the arab world brought a spike in threat
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
to get business pools fix for this environment, and we think this $52 million will be sufficient. >> i will end there, but i have other questions for the record. that last question was and did you and i have talked about that maximizes delivered to veterans in tough locations, rural locations, so i thank you for that effort. >> senator blumenthal? >> thank you, mr. chairman, and i apologize for being late, but i have been following some of the testimony and want to thank you all for your service, and, mr. secretary, particularly for your active-duty service to our nation and now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing resources available veterans in a very difficult time to escalate. let me begin with senator begich's question relating to electronic health record. i understood that you describe what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. he asked for a target date for completing the program. >> we're talking about claims here. >> the electronic record system. recordelectronic help system is still going forward. >
environment. in my previous discussions with general allan, it is obvious the right level is closer to the 352,0020. that the 2013 and 2014 fighting seasons are critical to setting conditions for success and i worry that inadequate funding will erode the fighting capability of our troops on the front line. president's budget proposal last week has to address the unprecedented resource challenges facing our military and will hurt the readiness of our military. to preserve our place, the navy is tying up carrier strike groups. the air force is surrounding aircraft. the effect of this deteriorating readiness will be felt by the fighting forces in 2014, by the men and women we sent into combat next year. the president's must get serious about working with the congress on a lasting solution to the challenges facing our military. the troops fighting for this nation deserve nothing less. i think you very much -- i thank you very much. >> thank you. welcome. >> good morning distinguished members of the committee. i appreciate the opportunity to represent the men and women of the u.s. forces of the afg
store and there are issues i have about consumer protection in that environment. while i appreciate, it is a concept that could work, we need strategies that are going to take into consideration varying factors and that the goal here, and in addition to being able to be in the black, is that, you have a public service and we have to serve these con at this time cents. i would really encourage you with your leadership on the board of governors to really think about ways that are going to be unique, more than just flexibility to get there. that you're looking at quality, connectivity, those relationships, the rural fabric in these states, related to the post office. when i was in inaing the postal service was a very effective partner in receiving those constituents, thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. and recognize the gentleman from mr. georgia. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just in listening and writing down notes, we went all over the map from the importance of postal service. i don't think anybody will detract from that. we talked before. you been in committees before. i serve an
for a few hours, and to institute a special targeting roles, both in the air environment and at the canadian import environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. again,spect to fema, when you saw the response in boston and how coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november boston held a mass of exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event, and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercises courted by the committee to fhrough fema, crease in our ability for response and resilience. we provided several intel products and briefings to law enforcement across the country, critical conner and operators, and we have been reaching out to community organizations who want to know what they can do. we are and lamenting security measures, both seen and unseen, at airports, transit hubs with in the maritime and run it, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is providing security on the ferries in the doing area, and teams are searches on terms of ground transportation and fell like. and finally, with respect to
. the environment is not agreed to. >> a few minutes ago, the minority in the united states senate decided it was not worth it. they blocked common sense gun reforms even while the families looked on from the senate gallery. >> a big loss for president obama and big loss from the fam faps from newtown who traveled to washington to lobby lawmakers and they lost on the big amendment that was agreed to by democrat manchin and republican toomey. republicans that voted yes, toomey and kirk and collins from maine and mccain from arizona. democrats who voted no. hicamp from north dakota. prior from arkansas . begas from alaska and baucus and reid. >> at the white house it was technically more bipartisan. even hoe harry reid did vote the way he did. i was struck by the want president's comments just before we went on air when he let loose on with a tirade. now, i don't think it was likely anyway. but the president is not -- and that is the way he attacks today . if you read the president's comments simply on the attack of the fellow red state demdements. it is a searing indictment of them and the
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
as well as the overall fiscal environment, i believe that controlling energy costs across the board now and in the future is an important goal for the department of defense. the operational energy implementation plan that was -- that identified incorporating energy security concerns into the requirements and acquisitions process as one of the targets for the department to implement, you know, i wtedte importance of those goals and how we are doing and making sure that energy use criteria and factors are consideredded in acquisition planning processes. >> thank you, senator. as i noted in my response for me or the leadership in the department of defense, our energy use, our energy sources, cost and energy, are and must be a high priority. that's research and development. it's not just budget, but it's the security, reliant of our sources of energy, so we continue to put a high priority on programs. we continue to invest in those programs. as you noted, as has been much of the conversation this morning, we have less money. >> uh-huh. >> appears we're going to have even less money, so we h
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
everyone, a set of rules that is designed to create an environment of law and order rather than one of chaos, and then make sure those rules are implemented in an evenhanded fashion so as not to advantage any particular business at the expense of another. that is the best way government can support that, and when the government tries to go beyond that or promises to go beyond that, it usually ends up picking the winners and losers, and it becomes destructive to the free market economy and to the interest we're trying to achieve through the free market economy and a robust, free civil society. >> francis johnson, should teach it planning initiative. we have a challenge before us of gaining more of the general public or least a set of them we'rell see the wisdom talking about here, and then, if you will, support legislators and senators for congress who believe the same thing. enlarge these people may be to start with the end game, tell some stories about particular people with names or surrogate names that have been benefited by the jail whohe father in receives compassion and a fair
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american in a substrata of the chechen organization. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. it is a positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization. host: national
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
, but in this environment, the one thing i would ask for is more latitude in how we take the cut to fit the money with the most important payoff is. with respect to the question you raised, it is an age-old one and intelligence. the approach or try to take in the last two years is try to protect and invest in capabilities that give us the most general coverage. that's why a very strong on sustaining our overhead reconnaissance capability because it covers the earth, denied area or not and similarly, even when times are then, human capability is extremely important. that's when the hu what dr. vickers are io brilliae as much as it is a reshaping, recastg he organization i started in 1992 caughhet t defense humanrvice. better integration with the fbi and the cia. more clandestine case officer's who are worth their weight in gold. the unique capability no one else can render. as they make reductions, we have to focus much much more on quality, quality of investment since are not going to have in numbers. >> one quick question that's come up a number of times. and there is clear evidence, public evid
leave feeling our cars but giving a desolation to the environment, do you believe man will develop environmentally sound modes of transportation out of sheer will to be accountable as inhabitants of earth? host: i will give you the last comment. guest: that's a good question. there are multiple ways of thinking about this. some would argue that the government should support certain industries and drive that an ovation. others argue that should be a market-based mechanism whereby the most effective solution to some of these problems will be achieved when we are indeed in dire need of them and there is the financial and economic incentive to do so. i'm not sure where i come down on that. host: anthony costello, we appreciate you joining us today. guest: thank you for having me. that host: is our show today and we will take you live to the senate judiciary committee hearing on the immigration overhaul legislation. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning. we welcome everybody here. and i am glad th
be idea to pay for some things in a political environment. not to say it will because of the political coalition that is against this is quite powerful, but seems to me there's more of a possibility now than in the past. if that's of any solace. >> let me address a little bit the patient-doctor relationship or the patient-doctor-doctor relationship, which is maybe just as important, more important. one of the criticisms of traditional medicare, it is an uncoordinated system. that's correct. and the coordination isn't just between patient and doctor. obviously the fee for service incentives can get in the way of that. but it's also the failure of traditional medicare to really provide structure incentives that encourage coordination across the continuum of care, doctor to doctor, doctor to hospital. medicare is not unique in this but medicare could take more of a leading role in trying to resolve a problem that's a very difficult issue. in the end, i think what we need is health plans, whether it's medicare or other plans, that focus on this and i think that's going to be driven by the
of rules that govern everyone, a set of rules that is designed to create an environment of law and order rather than one of chaos, and then make sure those rules are implemented in an even-handed fashion so as not to advantage any particular business at the expense of another. that is the best way government can support that, and when the government tries to go beyond that or promises to go beyond that, it usually ends up picking the winners and losers, and it becomes destructive to the free market economy and to the interest we're trying to achieve through the free market economy and a robust, free civil society. >> frances johnson, planning initiative. we have a challenge before us of gaining more of the general public or least a set of them who will see the wisdom we're talking about here, and then, if you will, support legislators and senators for congress who believe the same thing. now, a way to enlarge these people may be to start with the end game, tell some stories about particular people with names or surrogate names that have been benefited by the system, the father in jail wh
and energy activity in hat fast-changing environment. congress should ensure that the coast guard has the tools they need to do all we ask them to do. while our nation struggles with finding a responsible balance of fiscal restraint with a budget that meets our needs and responsibilities, i'm concerned about the nearly $1 billion reduction proposed in the coast guard fiscal year 2014 budget. last year we passed an authorization bill for the coast guard that authorized over $17 million more than the president's request would provide. it represented a
environment facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these resource constraints has already led to significant and ongoing belt- tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs, and overhead expenditures. it has also given us an opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates, who canceled or curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead within the military services and across the defense enterprise. these efforts reduced the department's topline by $78 billion over a five year period, as detailed in the department's fy 2012 budget plan. the realignment continued under secretary panetta, who worked closely with the president and the joint chiefs of staff to craft new defense strategic guidance and a fy 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's topline by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for the department of
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27